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20131202
20131210
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KQED (PBS) 35
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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
the focus today, away from what's gone wrong with implementing the health care law to what's gone right. he said the benefits are being overlooked amid problems with the web site and policy cancellations. but insurers still warn they're getting unusable data. we'll have a full report on the president's new p.r. push right after the news summary. >> the university of notre dame over the healthcare law's mandate to cover birth control for students and employees. school officials went to court today arguing they are being forced to violate roman catholic teachings, a federal judge dismissed a similar suit last year, saying the it was not yet facing imminent penalties under the law. >> a federal judge has cleared the city of detroit to proceed with its bankruptcy filing and shed up to $18 billion in debt. it's the largest public bankruptcy in u.s. history. the judge turned aside challenges from unions, pension funds and retirees who stand to have benefits cut. later, retiring mayor dave bing called for all parties to work together. >> we have got to start changing the conversation and we can't
the law would not change. >> you've got good ideas? bring them to me. let's go. but we are not repealing it as long as i'm president. [applause] we will make it good for all americans. such thing as an obamacare health plan. here in washington, d.c. and in some states, they are expanding free care for those of low income. this website is helping people choose between several private plans. it makes picking a mortgage or pension look simple. it has become a symbol for the law that will almost certainly define obama hoss presidency. -- obama's presidency. many have been questioning his competency, and indeed, his presidency. folk fun at the failure, and also took advantage of a chance to criticize the coalition. they have seen the private sector fail and they believe the government can solve their problems. and now they have seen the government fail. i think they will have a much more jaundiced view of what government can do for them in the future. -- >> the affordable care act in a sense is going to change my life. ofwill eliminate a lot stress because it covers things that my previous in
the standard of banking laws. >> with the completion of the vocal rule, resolution authority, stronger capital, the tools of financial reform are being used to make the financial system safer and hold financial institutions responsible for baring their risk. >> lieu heads to australia in february for a meeting. >>> jp morgan chase is warning nearly half a million holders of prepaid cash cards that their personal information may have been accessed by hackers. the cards were issued by several corporations to pay employees and by some government agency s issuing tax refunds and unemployment benefits. >>> still ahead, will twitter's big plan to make more money pay off for shareholders, or will this add strategy potentially backfire? >>> the biggest decliner in the dow today, microsoft. invest tors dumped shares on hearing that alan the ceo of ford may not take the wheel. there is intense speculation he will step into the job after the contract at ford ends in 2014. here is how he answered to phil lebeau about taking the top job. >> i'm honored to serve ford and we have no change in the plan. >> re
a five-year low, the affordable care act may be turning the corner. >> this law is working and will future.o the gwen: is it all too good to be true? >> while the white house wants to claim that healthcare.gov is now working, we know that obamacare is still plagued with problems. gwen: outside washington, detroit is headed into bankruptcy, pensions are disappearing and low wage workers say they're being left out. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country. gwen: and -- we remember nelson mandela. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. gwen: covering the week, jackie calmes of the "new york times," michael fletcher of "the washington post," and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live, from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- we know inw-up, cyber world, threats are always evolving. we were protecting networks, then we were protecting the tra
the total for the entire month of october. president obama talked up the law's benefits in washington today, and brushed aside rising disapproval in public polls. >> more people without insurance have gained insurance, more than three million young americans who've been able to stay on their parents' plan, the more than half a million americans and counting who are poised to get coverage starting on january 1, some for the very first time. and it is these numbers, not the ones in any poll, that will ultimately determine the fate of this law. >> woodruff: republicans said the new numbers on enrollment are cold comfort to millions who've had their coverage canceled or face higher premiums. 9-1-1 phone calls from sandy hook elementary school, during last year's mass shooting, were made public today. the seven recordings revealed police dispatchers in newtown, connecticut, urging callers to take cover, even as gunfire echoed. 20 children and six educators were shot to death by 20-year- old adam lanza. a judge ordered the audio material released under the state's freedom of information law. the
to the law there should be stronger executive oversight there needs to be enhanced review by the courts. and there needs to be a bit more transparency, certainly, so that we can all have the confidence in the public that we live in a safe country. but also one where we know enough about what the government is doing to be confident that people are striking the right balance. >> isn't it the case that the tech companies, though, have been providing data to the government? >> well, for many years, we have been responding to subpoenas, to warrants, to court orders. we, of course, know what we have been doing. but frankly, what really surprised people across the tech sector was at the end of october, "the washington post" reported that beyond these legal processes, there were government evidents to infect collect data. in this instance it was data moving between the data centers within yahoo! and within google. and that wasn't within the confines of any legal process that anybody was aware of. and that shent a shockwave throughout the industry. >> i've been reading today what some of the pri
from fiber on particular cables over southeast. >> what about the chance of a new law being passed? >> hard to know where this is going. the u.s. congress is not known for its efficiency. this has gotten the world's attention. i think the shape is early to tell, but i wouldn't be surprised to see some kind of act. >> doesn't the government have a case when it cease it needs all this information to protect national security. >> sure. if my job was to prevent titleist attacks, i want everything all over the world. the question is do we as citizens want information collected on us all the time or only in certain investigations. that is the rub. >> how do you draw the line? >> that is tough. they have a massive bulk take. >> how do you define the procedures behind the boston bombings. >> they didn't find them until after they started bombing. there are questions about how effective they are. perfect privacy might mean no security. >> whatever happens, the companies are going to carry on mining our data and sending it to companies? isn't the government after the same stuff? >> google ca
apartheid's unjust laws. but by 1960s the harsh right's resistance to the peaceful process, caw caused mandela and his colleagues to form a military wing operating underground. their cause was called spirit of the nation, aimed at civil installations and not soft or human targets but in times can, the anc their acts bore no comparison to the thousands murdered in otherwise disappeared by the regime. >> there are many people whofeed futile for us to continue talkintalking peace and nonviole against a government whose reply is only savage attacks. well i'm on the defenseless people. >> in 1962 a vishz crack downwas caught up in the regime's wide net. his anc colleagues were rounded up and jailed. in 1963 during what came to be called the ravonia trial, the government tried and convicted mandela and seven of the top command of the anc on charges of sabotage and fomenting revolution. a capital offense. the eight were sentenced to life in prison. even from his cell on robin island, the alcatraz like island, six miles from cape town, mandela was uncompromising, says helen, a parliament servi
of an important enrollment period for the healthcare law and its battle-scarred federal website. but, for now, the obama administration says it has good news. although performance can still be spotty, things are better than they were. the white house and the nation's top health agency say users shopping for insurance on healthcare.gov are having far more success today than a month ago. the troubled site, officials said, is working nearly 90 percent of the time for consumers, and that today, there were 375,000 people visits by noon. >> we believe we made the important progress that we set out to make by november 30 but as we said in november, and as i said just now, the work continues to make improvements that still need to be made to the website. >> ifill: officials say the site can handle 50,000 users at one time, and up to 800,000 each day. the health and human services department also said the site's so-called "back end," which delivers information to insurers, had been largely repaired. but problems remain. insurance companies remain unhappy. and increased volume could provide new tests a
currently teaching in this country: penelope andrews is president and dean of the albany law school. mzamo mangaliso is a management professor at the university of massacusetts, amherst. charles villa-vicencio was the national research director in the south african truth and reconciliation commission. he's a visiting professor at georgetown university. penelope andrews i want to start with you. if i can frame it personally first tell us what nelson mandela meant to you growing newspaper south africa, how did you see him? >> well, for me growing up in south africa, certainly nelson mandela was a in many ways a mythical figure. but he also became a sim symbol of what south africa was to become. an mandela has always represented for me as a lawyer, a profound commitment to the rule of law, to constitutionalism and the possibilities of law to change people's lives. and i think he means that to me as a lawyer but also to the vast, large number of people who have looked at south africa's transmission-- transition an seen what the constitution has been able to do, despite the limitations because
're demanding the prime minister resign. she had tried to push through a law that would have granted amnesty for her brother. he was overthrown after being accused of corruption and abuse of power. authorities fear the protests could damage the nation's economy, particularly its $6 billion a year tourism industry. >>> it was a day of mourning in scotland today, a day after a police helicopter crashed into a pub, killing at least eight people. our british partner itv reports from glasgow. >> across scotland, people paid their respects today. a minute silence was held before the scottish cup match with celtic. ♪ and a special service was held at glasgow cathedral, just a few hundred yards from the street of the cash. the police chaplain has been supporting bereaved officers and those who have worked long, difficult hours here. >> we have seen the courage of glasgow. we've seen the sadness. and then we'll see that drive and that passion and that life and that humor come back to the force. >> with all real hope of rescue now gone, a recovery operation is underway at the bar in glasgow. piece b
and the people on the rallies must all , he toldhe law interviewers from four different tv channels. >> but his rivals called on him to step down. foreign language] >> there is still an arab determination from the protesters thomas who say they won't go away until the president resigns -- from the protesters, who say they won't go away until the president resigns. >> we want to see a new leader and government here in the ukraine. >> i think most people will stay here. all of the ukraine is coming here. >> people are coming every day. >> it is just the beginning. >> the trigger for these protests was the president's decision to postpone ukraine's move toward the european union and away from russia. for many, especially in the western half of this divided country, that was a reason to take to the streets and remain there. they say they will stay here until the government falls. bbc news, kiev. >> for more on the unrest in ukraine, i spoke a short time ago with the director of the 's [indiscernible] think he underestimated the desire to be closer to europe and perhaps less close to russia? >> ther
the affordable care act. >> this law is working, and will work into the future. people want the financial stability of health insurance, and we're going to keep on working to fix whatever problems come up in any startup, any launch of a project this big that has an impact on 1/6th of our economy. whatever comes up, we're going to just fix it. >> administration released a new report showing that through that website nearly 1.5 million americans have now been found eligible for medicaid and that was during the month of october. >> still ahead on "nightly business report", we'll tell you about the company many are calling the big winner of black friday and cyber monday. >>> more numbers coming in for consumer spending over the long thanksgiving and black friday weekend. shopper track a provider of retail an lit ticks reports that sales rose 1% at brick and mortar stores during the four days compared to so-called black weekend sale as year ago. shopper track says total spending topped $22 billion. >>> not a lot on that money was being spent on perm computers. ibc says shipments of pcs are exp
image was and. it was not lawful to have an image of nelson mandela. people were sent to prison for having a photograph of him. he had been suppressed. he finally made that walk to freedom. the very next day, i remember sitting in the garden at the first conference that he gave and i asked him quite simply, what surprised you most as he made that walk to the prison gates and he said, it was a number of white people that have come out among the huge crowd. that was a deliberately reconciling statement already had that very first instant that he was being political. he was holding out a hand to the minority that had oppressed him. he knew he had to embrace. that is extraordinary to hear from a man who lost 27 years of life, had been imprisoned when his first son had died. who have suffered so much deprivation. was radiating forgiveness. that is my abiding memory. he was in the fullest sense of this word a unique figure. >> he was. it was his utter dignity and forgiveness that marked him out. he inspired whole nations and i want to make one brief point, he the whiteranscended regim
is and complete. we may have got rid of the race laws but this is sterile -- is still in an equal country. alongnequality is divided ethnic and racial lines. well people are grateful for what nelson mandela did for this country, bringing it from a apartheid past into a post-apartheid present, many feel that to fulfill his vision, a lot of work still needs to be done. >> get real gatehouse speaking to me earlier -- gabriel gatehouse speaking to me earlier. he had been described as a visionary and one of the greatest leaders of our time. here in the u.s., tributes have been coming in from those who knew him or who simply felt his influence and former president george w. bush and his wife laura will join the obama's when they travel to south africa. we have this report. >> the flag at the white house flies at half mast in honor of a man who means much to america. inside on the desk of the u.s.'s thereblack president sits out oh, a memento of their first meeting. when obama visited the present on robben island in south africa he told his doubters of the link mandela, gandhi, and martin luther
of the race laws but this is sterile -- is still in an equal country. alongnequality is divided ethnic and racial lines. well people are grateful for what nelson mandela did for this country, bringing it from a apartheid past into a post-apartheid present, many feel that to fulfill his vision, a lot of work still needs to be done. >> get real gatehouse speaking to me earlier -- gabriel gatehouse speaking to me earlier. he had been described as a visionary and one of the greatest leaders of our time. here in the u.s., tributes have been coming in from those who knew him or who simply felt his influence and former president george w. bush and his wife laura will join the obama's when they travel to south africa. we have this report. >> the flag at the white house flies at half mast in honor of a man who means much to america. inside on the desk of the u.s.'s thereblack president sits out oh, a memento of their first meeting. when obama visited the present on robben island in south africa he told his doubters of the link mandela, gandhi, and martin luther king. >> we will not likely see t
-year low, the affordable care act may be turning the corner. >> this law is working and will future.o the gwen: is it all too good to be true? >> while the white house wants to claim that healthcare.gov is now working, we know that obamacare is still plagued with problems. gwen: outside washington, detroit is headed into bankruptcy, pensions are disappearing and low wage workers say they're being left out. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country.
are cheap. actions are everything. my brother-in-law is a zen buddhist monk at the monday as terri in upstate new york. and he said a phrase to me once that i just love. which is our actions are the ground we walk on. >> rose: now here about this, my friend david brooks. at the time everybody was saying you've got to find yourself, david brooks said no, that's not right. what you have to do is find something larger than self so you can lose yourself. lose yourself in religion, lose yourself in the pursuit of an obsession. to pursue to do something do something that's not about who i am. >> yes, i think the rescue what's that thing you throw out on a boat that's sir you can lar that says, the lifesaving, the when you throw that out, that rescues you. when it's not but. get your face and your head and your mind out of your own navel and pay attention to someone else. pay attention to your wife to your children to your coworker. when i'm working i work so hard to prepare for one reason, so that when i'm out there in front of the audience or in front of the camera with the other actor,
once told me a lovely story when young nelson mandela who first came to johannesburg to study law walked into zulu ice real estate office in soweto we were just trying to become a mass movement and one day a mass leader walked into my office. >> rose: also part of this program, a conversation with nelson mandela which took place here on this program in 1993. >> and the lesson is that the method of the people, the method of political method to be used, part determined by the oppressor himself, if the oppres oppressos peaceful means, we will never result to violence. it is when the oppressor in addition to repressive policies uses violence that the oppress have had no alternative but to retaliate by similar forms of action. and therefore, the pains, the blood that was spilled, the responsibility for that lies squarely on the soldiers. >> rose: mandela for the hour, next. >> funding for charlie rose but provided by the following. >> captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. et it fall, let there be work,b, god bless south afr
of publice policies like minimum wage laws, organizing, we're seeing in consumer pressure, all can come together to begin to do that. >> okay. very interesting, and much more debate to come in the new year, i'm sure, with congressional calls, as well, for a federal minimum wage hike. soe1i] i want to thank you both being here. ken jacobs and ron unz, thanks for being with us. >> thank you. >>> the bay area has long been known as an incubator ofxd innovation. one epicenterkÑf that creativity of stanford, alsoÑi knowne1 as the school.fá the d school nurtures outside--y(uitÑ thinking in hopes of tackling+ of the worls toughest problems. it's the focus ofe1 a new documentrqxd called "extreme by design." it follows groups of stanfordìc& working to create extremely affordableó[i] solut to address poverty in the developing world.w3 scott shafer sat down with filmmakere1 ralph king ande1 foá student pamly potkov. first, here's a cliff from v= before departing for their teams must come up with several crude prototypes. >> this is a vertical axis wind turbine. it captures wind by using
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)